Live Auction: 10 commissioned works inspired by the road with works by Matthew Brandt, Matthew Porter and Alex Prager.
Other artists include Todd Hido, Justine Kurland, Joel Meyerowitz, Lise Sarfati, Alec Soth and Hank Willis Thomas.
Tuesday, October 21, 2014Terminal 5, New York CityVIP Auction preview: 6:00 pmAll guests: 7:00 pm - 11:00 pm
Buy your tickets here. 

Live Auction: 10 commissioned works inspired by the road with works by Matthew Brandt, Matthew Porter and Alex Prager.

Other artists include Todd Hido, Justine Kurland, Joel Meyerowitz, Lise Sarfati, Alec Soth and Hank Willis Thomas.

Tuesday, October 21, 2014
Terminal 5, New York City
VIP Auction preview: 6:00 pm
All guests: 7:00 pm - 11:00 pm

Buy your tickets here

"Études Studio invited the Canadian artist Jessica Eaton to conceive the collection’s lead pattern. The imagery used in the True Real collection comes from the XPol series, for which Jessica Eaton used a “cross polarization” process consisting of intersecting two polarizing filters (one vertical, the other horizontal) so that rays of light directed through a piece of plastic refract in unpredictable ways. She refutes the abstract dimension of this series of photographs: “What you are seeing is information that is very real, just not accessible through our sensory abilities”. 

See the collection here

"The exhibition’s emphasis is placed on looking at the processes through which the work is made, rather than what is represented in the photographic image. For this reason, the images contained in the work have a generalized broad range, extending from landscapes and portraits, to still lives and abstractions. The varying processes result in a type of aggregated form and artifact created by merging photography with sculpture and/or painting. In some cases, as with the work of James Hyde and Kunie Sugiura, the work physically combines painting and photography. In other cases, as with Hannah Whitaker and Carrie Pollack, the work incorporates painting conceptually through multiple exposures or digital layers. The work of John Houck, Mariah Robertson, and Klea McKenna emphasize both flat and varied perspectival spaces, which are traditionally left to painting. While the work of Letha Wilson, Fabiola Menchelli, Heather Cleary and Sara VanDerBeek allude to painting, it is more invested in the language of sculpture. Wilson actually folds an image into curing concrete and Cleary, Menchelli, and VanDerBeek photograph sculptures, either found or constructed in their studios. Lastly, Phil Chang’s nearly identical triptych suggests with the depiction of a monochrome print, curled at one end, that we can simultaneously see aspects of painting, sculpture and photography."

On view October 11 - November 8, 2014
Opening reception: Saturday, October 11, 5:30 - 7:30pm

A few more days left to see Jon Rafman at Balice Hertling. “Today : Morrow” is a group exhibition curated by Romain Dauriac organized by Paris based Balice Hertling, taking place at the gallery’s project space in New York. On view through Saturday, October 11, 2014. 





Today : Morrow investigates an uncertain future of hyper-technology, inhuman supremacy, disembodiment, and the quest for absolute purity. The artworks in this show explore the relationship between the virtual and real, consumerism and ideology, seduction and production, as well as between artificial intelligence and human instinct.

The artists in the show create hybrid works by applying new technology to handmade materials. In so doing, they question the relationship between immaterial information and the physical world. Many of the works both criticize and glorify the Internet as a tool of self-promotion.Today : Morrow presents a precarious image, the contemporary one we collectively feel in this digital age, where incongruous combinations such as corporate design and romanticism, industrially produced wallpaper and gold-smithery, or poetry and 3D printing might appear.

"To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow, Creeps in this petty pace from day to day,",William Shakespeare, Macbeth Act 5, scene 5, 19-28




- Romain Dauriac

A few more days left to see Jon Rafman at Balice Hertling. “Today : Morrow” is a group exhibition curated by Romain Dauriac organized by Paris based Balice Hertling, taking place at the gallery’s project space in New York. On view through Saturday, October 11, 2014. 

Today : Morrow investigates an uncertain future of hyper-technology, inhuman supremacy, disembodiment, and the quest for absolute purity. The artworks in this show explore the relationship between the virtual and real, consumerism and ideology, seduction and production, as well as between artificial intelligence and human instinct.

The artists in the show create hybrid works by applying new technology to handmade materials. In so doing, they question the relationship between immaterial information and the physical world. Many of the works both criticize and glorify the Internet as a tool of self-promotion.

Today : Morrow presents a precarious image, the contemporary one we collectively feel in this digital age, where incongruous combinations such as corporate design and romanticism, industrially produced wallpaper and gold-smithery, or poetry and 3D printing might appear.

"To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow, Creeps in this petty pace from day to day,",
William Shakespeare, Macbeth Act 5, scene 5, 19-28
Romain Dauriac

Today starts the key stretch of FotoFocus Biennial activities at Memorial Hall, which begin at 8 p.m. with Triumph of the Wild, a show of animated firms by Martha Colburn accompanied by music from Thollem McDonas, Tatiana Berman and the four-person Constella Ensemble.

Friday, October 10, at 1 p.m., the film Somewhere to Disappear (2011), With Alec Soth screens, followedby a response from Matthew Porter. 

Last week to see Phantoms in the Dirt, group exhibition with work by Matthew Brandt at Museum of Contemporary Photography in Columbia College, Chicago.
The sixteen artists in this exhibition present an array of physical remnants and enigmatic traces, ranging from cryptic objects to the marks of human activity in rugged landscapes. Searching for phantoms in the dirt, so to speak, their works reckon with the facts of matter, the nature of photographic imagery, and the forces (sometimes invisible) that leave their mark on our surroundings. In doing so, they are also considering how the visible and the tangible—or sometimes what our senses can’t apprehend at all—shape our encounters with the world around us or generate mutable senses of meaning. Perhaps tellingly, their work is often both matter-of-fact and mysterious, an empirical approach even giving way to atmospheric or inscrutable results. At the same time, these works offer a range of outlooks on the possibilities of photography and sculpture. One medium would seem to favor the aloof image, the other matter itself; both, however, offer myriad ways to examine, or grapple with, the material world, whether at its most substantial or elusive. 
Guest curated by Karsten Lund (Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago).
Artists: Jeremy Bolen, Matthew Brandt, Shannon Ebner, Assaf Evron, Anya Gallaccio, Jay Heikes, Joachim Koester, Harold MendezRichard Mosse, Eileen Mueller, Arthur Ou, Alison Rossiter, Adam Schreiber, Daniel Shea, Greg Stimac, Shane Ward.
On view: Jul 24 — Oct 5, 2014
 

Last week to see Phantoms in the Dirt, group exhibition with work by Matthew Brandt at Museum of Contemporary Photography in Columbia College, Chicago.

The sixteen artists in this exhibition present an array of physical remnants and enigmatic traces, ranging from cryptic objects to the marks of human activity in rugged landscapes. Searching for phantoms in the dirt, so to speak, their works reckon with the facts of matter, the nature of photographic imagery, and the forces (sometimes invisible) that leave their mark on our surroundings. In doing so, they are also considering how the visible and the tangible—or sometimes what our senses can’t apprehend at all—shape our encounters with the world around us or generate mutable senses of meaning. Perhaps tellingly, their work is often both matter-of-fact and mysterious, an empirical approach even giving way to atmospheric or inscrutable results. At the same time, these works offer a range of outlooks on the possibilities of photography and sculpture. One medium would seem to favor the aloof image, the other matter itself; both, however, offer myriad ways to examine, or grapple with, the material world, whether at its most substantial or elusive. 

Guest curated by Karsten Lund (Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago).

Artists: Jeremy Bolen, Matthew Brandt, Shannon Ebner, Assaf Evron, Anya Gallaccio, Jay Heikes, Joachim Koester, Harold Mendez
Richard Mosse, Eileen Mueller, Arthur Ou, Alison Rossiter, Adam Schreiber, Daniel Shea, Greg Stimac, Shane Ward.

On view: Jul 24 — Oct 5, 2014